From my Twitter feed: #hamradio t-shirts, cheap key, Broadband HamNet

I don’t usually include two Tweets from the same guy, but the two below from KE9V are great…Dan

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9v
Get the #hamradio Beefy-T shirt. ke9v.net/tees

 

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9v
My straight key it’s nicer but this one is more affordable. #hamradio pic.twitter.com/F563k9QPJI

 

ZionArtis's avatar

Zion Artis KF4NOD @ZionArtis
I find this very interresting. Introduction to HSMM-MESH or Broadband-Hamnet: youtu.be/hUeW2ju-RZk via @YouTube

Lack of standardization holding back amateur digital communications

Via Twitter, I recently found out that Yaesu had introduced a new digital communication system—called System Fusion—at the ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference in Seattle, WA. When I asked KE9V, the guy who posted this announcement to Twitter whether or not Fusion was going to be more than a niche product, he replied, “I think it’s a long-shot at best. ICOM has dumped a lot of cash in D-STAR and now years later it’s just catching on. Tough road.”

Compounding the fact that Yaesu is late to the party is the fact that the radios are probably going to cost an arm and a leg, just like the D-STAR radios. Call me an old fart—and I have been called that and worse—but I just don’t see where the digital features are worth the extra bucks. (I would be happy to be convinced otherwise, though. Please feel free to comment on this below.)

Wouldn’t it have been nice if Yaesu and Icom, and maybe even Kenwood, had gotten together and developed a digital communication standard that both companies could support? Not only would have it made it more palatable to invest in such a radio, I bet those radios and repeaters would cost less than the current D-STAR and Fusion offerings. That’s just what happens when companies adopt standards.

As Bob, K0NR, tweeted, “File this under ‘missed opportunity.'” I agree.

p.s. I wanted to include a picture of the system, but the Yaesu website doesn’t yet have any yet on their website. There is, however, a YouTube video of the DCC meeting at which Yaesu introduced the product.

From my inbox: interplanetary communication, emcomm router, 3.3V logic

From ACM Tech News 5/8/13. Now all we need are sub-space transceivers….Dan
Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist on Creating the Interplanetary Internet
Wired News (05/06/13) Adam Mann
Google chief Internet evangelist and ACM president Vint Cerf has been working for years on an interplanetary Internet with protocols capable of handling a space environment. Together with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Cerf has created an early-stage space-based network with a few nodes that he says are “the front end of what could be an evolving and expanding interplanetary backbone.” The project began in 1997 when Cerf considered what the Internet might need in 25 years, and concluded that NASA and other space-faring agencies would need greater networking capabilities. The interplanetary protocol has the capacity to store a large amount of data for a long time prior to transmission. If the protocol is adopted by the Consultative Committee on Space Data Systems, which standardizes space communication protocols, then all robotic and manned space missions will have the option of using these protocols. View Full Article

Also from ACM Tech News 5/8/13. Sound like something useful for emcomm….Dan
This Box Keeps Information Flowing During a Crisis

Technology Review (05/05/13) David Talbot
The creators of Ushahidi, a software platform for communicating information during a crisis, have developed BRCK, a Wi-Fi router that can connect with any network in the world, can provide eight hours of wireless connectivity, and can be programmed for new applications. The BRCK device can serve up to 20 devices when there is an Internet connection and connects to a cloud-based server that enables any BRCK user to monitor its performance remotely and manage alerts. The device also is programmable, apps can be written for it, and it comes with up to 16 GB of storage. “Once you understand what the product does–provides a reliable connectivity backup in places where power and connectivity are spotty–it’s hard to understand why no one has built the tool before,” says Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Ethan Zuckerman, who serves on the board of Ushahidi. The nonprofit company says the purpose behind BRCK was to build the world’s most simple, reliable, and rugged Internet connection device, but with sophisticated cloud-based features. “No other single device does these off-grid communications, software cloud access, and remote management of sensors connected to it,” says Ushahidi co-founder Erik Hersman. View Full Article

From André N4ICK via the Tacos mailing list…..Dan
This could be useful (see table of contents): 3V (Logic) Tips ‘n Tricks.

From my Twitter feed: FreeDV, W3EDP antenna, IARU on WRC-15

I haven’t been a big advocate of digital voice (DV), but I’m beginning to think it might be fun.

ke9v
Saw a little FreeDV love on Planet Ubuntu in the form of this post. Nice job by 9M2PJU.http://t.co/bdlzFMKVKU #hamr

 

Also, see My Favorite Cheap HF Antenna, The W3EDP on KG4GVL’s blog.

KG4GVL
Latest update on the W3EDP antenna. by: Brandon, the Random Man: More on the W3EDP http://t.co/niN6lzHAUO

 

Are more HF allocations in our future?

amradvictoria
IARU announces WRC-15 positionshttp://t.co/jFofmX02FF #hamradio

 

From my Twitter feed: Whitebox, four-layer PCBs, propagation service

HamBeat1
Combining Software Defined Radios and Smart Phones: http://t.co/reduPzk6Qn#hamradio #hamr

This is a very interesting project, and I hope that it gains some traction.

mikelectricstuf
How 4 layer PCBs are made http://t.co/R4VNy2yloj

DH1TW
Radio Propagation as a service http://t.co/siVQ8tEDsQ #hamr @k6tu

30 bucks seems reasonable for this service.

From my Twitter feed: software-defined scanner, TAPR in Seattle, the art of electronics

n0rc
How to get started using the #rtlsdr as a scanner for as little as $19http://t.co/VK3qKdpMJS #sdr #hamr

This looks like fun…..Dan

 

HamBeat1
Seattle Will Host the 32nd Digital Communications Conference:http://t.co/0xGJUpjw1C #hamradio #hamr

I should have gone last year, when it was a lot closer……Dan

 

o0ToTOm0o
The Art of Electronics – Horowitz & Hillhttp://t.co/4p2rYYfcvV

A classic! Get it. It’s free……Dan

From my Twitter feed: WWV, smart meters, freeDV

SWLingDotCom
History of WWV and the NIST Time Stations http://t.co/xKWgOX0mwj #shortwave #swl #dx

Concerned about RF effects from smart meter? Check out http://t.co/mht0hvGSrP for technical analysis of meter signals

Been playing with FreeDV? Looks like some very recent improvements have been made. http://t.co/4MtGko4U75 #hamr #DV

From my Twitter feed: JT65, Shack Nasties, hashtags

WB0LCW
@kb6nu The main program is JT65-HFhttps://t.co/Sz8ijw2m – also a handy add-on is jt-alert, found at http://t.co/MrpgL78X

ka3drr
#hamr m0xpd Shack Nasties is bookmarked and I like his sense of humor as a ham radio blogger including tech prowesshttp://t.co/vfxZllp6

hamradioskywave
http://t.co/nGCZt8nz ; Amateur “ham” radio hash tag proposal: #radio #cqdx #hamr_usa #hamr_world

From my Twitter feed: SDR, Hallicrafters, digital voice

KD4E_73
Just found this resource:http://t.co/wlqb30CF Coverage down to 50mHz is possible with one type & down to 22mHz with another.

Wish I had the time to play with these things…..Dan

w7dtg
W7DTG: Another boatanchor receiver demonstration Hallicra…http://t.co/QXZn29Pe

 

Ham_Radio_News
Amateur Radio – FreeDV – Digital Voice Software for Amateur Radio http://t.co/u01JTDMa #hamradio #hamr #dx#swl

I’m still not sold on digital voice, but if it were easy to set up, like say PSK-31, I’d give it a try, at least….Dan<

From the trade magazines – 092612

Three more articles from recent editions of the electronics trade magazines.

HeathkitHeathkit: A right-time, right-place business. Heathkit was a popular electronics company for decades before its demise earlier this year. Former employees Lou Frenzel and Chas Gilmore share some memories and discuss the factors that led to its closing. Lou Frenzel is W5LEF.

In the article, he notes how he was instrumental in developing the Heath/Zenith line of computer kits. At that time, I was a fledgling test engineer working for Memorex (remember them?) making the 8-in. floppy drives that were an option for those computers.

Real-world testing of wi-fi hotspots. This article talks about both the RF testing and data communications testing needed to ensure a good wi-fi hotspot.

How to simulate cable in SPICE. This article covers the two main loss effects related to cables (the skin effect and dielectric losses) and presents a simple cable modeling method for use in standard SPICE simulators.