From my Twitter Feed: Hamvention record, SW radio

N2NKW's avatarN2NKW
@hamvention I sure will if I can get a working radio. Did you know #hamvention in 1960 pressed a 45rpm record? youtube.com/watch?v=lOqe0o…

 

SWLingDotCom's avatarSWLing @SWLingDotCom
Another solution for whole-house shortwave
goo.gl/fb/HKiw9#shortwave#swl#dx

 

hackaday's avatar<b”>hackaday @hackaday
New post: [Balint]‘s GNU Radio Tutorials bit.ly/1i5LYHv

 

MW0IAN's avatar<b”>Ian >@MW0IAN
XMEGA-A3BU Xplained | AD9850 DDS controller firmware   kd1jv.qrpradio.com/XMEGA/XMEGA.htm

From my Twitter feed: bipolar transistors, homebrew Buddipole, Dayton survival

Planet Analog ?@PlanetAnalog 11m
Bipolar Transistor Circuit Design & Analysis, Part 1 – There are many applications for one or two transistors. Th… http://ow.ly/2EzTJR 

 

n1pce's avatarJohn Ryan @n1pce
Homebrew Buddipole with Modifications: youtu.be/Z6ATX2Z9ews via @YouTube

You don’t have to pay a lot for a Buddipole. By making one yourself, you can not only save money, but learn something in the process.

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9v
Dayton Survival Guide ke9v.net/articles/dayto…

The Dayton Hamvention, still the largest gathering of amateur radio enthusiasts in the world, takes place May 16-18, 2014. While I disagree with Jeff’s statement, “There’s simply no way to facilitate that size of a crowd for three days in an ultra modern facility,” the rest is pretty much spot on.

These instructions need some translation

Andre, N4ICK, posted this to the AMRAD mailing list, noting, “I recently acquired a rechargeable flashlight. Attached are the instructions, in … English. I particular enjoyed the  -succinct-  Schematic Drawings of Functions.”

These guys need to hire me to turn their instructions into readable English. :)

LED light001

Activity Report: Dayton, General class, Mini Maker Faire, Monroe hamfest

I realized the other day that I haven’t really been reporting on my own amateur radio activities lately. At first, I thought it was because I hadn’t really done much lately, but that’s not really true. So, here’s a report of some recent activity.

U-M ARC celebrates 100 years. The University of Michigan Amateur Radio Club recently celebrated it’s 100th anniversary. I helped them celebrate by operating during their special event on April 14th, 2013. The event was held on the  Central Campus Diag, and recognized the University’s first licensing as station 8XA in June of 1913. It was really cold and rainy that day, and the bands were pretty bad, but they had some hot coffee and donuts, and we had fun anyway.

Dayton 2013

In some ways, Dayton was kind of a washout for me. I came down with some  kind of stomach flu a couple of days before Dayton, and was even considering not going at all, but since I enjoy FDIM, and I was scheduled to speak at the  instructor’s forum on Friday morning, I decided to go.

As usual, FDIM was a blast. There were lots of good ideas being thrown around. I especially enjoyed the talk on receiver design by Rick, KK7B, and the talk on baluns by Rick, W7EL. They were all very good, though. The QRP-ARCI does a very good job lining up speakers.

I even participated in Vendor Night. Between talks, they had asked for volunteers to help set up tables for the vendors. It occurred to me that, if it didn’t cost much, I could show the CD-ROMs that I’d brought with me and pass the word about my free downloads. Well, it turned out that it didn’t cost a thing, so I asked for and they gave me a table.

I didn’t really expect to sell anything, as most of the folks there I’m sure had Extra Class licenses, but I did manage to sell one, and to talk to a lot of people about the study guides. So, overall, it worked out great.

On Friday, the entire morning was taken up, getting my speaker badge and then participating in the instructor’s forum. My talk about conducting one-day Tech classes went pretty well, but the forum didn’t end until noon, leaving me only five hours to peruse the flea market. That’s a fair amount of time, but I still wasn’t 100%, and my heart wasn’t really in it. I ended up buying not a single thing.

Saturday morning, I decided not to go to the Hamvention and just to pack it up and head home. I guess thinking about it, it wasn’t a complete washout, but I certainly didn’t get as much out of Dayton as I have in years past.

General class
I started a teaching a General Class course on Thursday evenings at the Hands-On Museum a couple of weeks ago. It’s a small class, but they’re enthusiastic. I am, of course, using my study guide as the text. Doing this has shown me how I can improve the next edition. I’ll be beefing up the explanations in a few spots and moving some things around.

Mini Maker Faire 2013 a success. This year’s Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire was held about a month ago, and if you ask me, it was a great success. As we have done for the past several years, Dave N8SBE and I anchored the station, and Prem KD8SVR, one of my recent Tech students joined us.

The table they first assigned us was inside, with no clear path for our coax to get outside to the antennas. After some negotiation, we found ourselves relocated outside. Then, once Dave had gotten his K3 gear all set up, they decided to move us again! We finally got settled about 10:45 am.

We got the usual type of visitors:

  • Those who were already hams. They stopped by to ragchew a little.
  • Inactive hams. We tried to get them energized to get back on the air. One of these was KA8ODD. What a great call!
  • Interested people. I passed out my card liberally, pointing them to my free study guide.
  • Not-so-interested people. I at least tried to get them and/or their kids to send their name in Morse Code.

One thing that I found interesting is how some people seem to naturally take to Morse Code while others do not. For those who have a natural fist, I can easily make out their names when they send it by looking up the characters on the code chart. When I do copy a name, I reach out my hand and say, “Hi, John (or Mary or whomever). Nice to meet you.” They seem to be amused that I was able to figure out their name from their sending.

Unfortunately, not everyone is a natural. If I can’t make out the name, I smile and say, “Good job!”

Monroe hamfest
Yesterday morning, I drove town to Monroe for a hamfest. It’s a small hamfest, but fun. Every time I’ve gone, the weather’s cooperated, and this is important because most of the sellers are outside. Yesterday, the temperature was in the upper 60s, and the sky started out overcast, but as the morning progressed, the sky cleared, and it was just beautiful.

I almost bought a Jones paddle for $75, but since I really don’t need another paddle, I put off the purchase until I was about ready to leave. By the time I got back to that seller, he’d already sold it to someone else. I’m more than OK with this. I saved 75 bucks! I did end up buying some PL-259s and some 3.5mm stereo plugs. As Ralph would say, this was the “requisite handful of connectors.”

#hamradiofilms

twitterToday, on Twitter, some folks decided to see if they could get a ham radio-related hashtag to show up as “trending.” They decided to do ham radio takeoffs of popular movies and tag them #hamradiofilms. There were a lot of good ones. Here are some that I found funny:

  • The Silence of the Hams
  • For a Few dB More
  • Dial Q for QRP
  • Dude, Where’s My QSL?
  • Transmission: Impossible
  • Toroid! Toroid! Toroid!
  • The King’s Speech (Compressor)
  • Ben Hz
  • The Hamshack Redemption
  • The Man with the Golden PL-259
  • Debbie Does DX
  • D-STAR Wars

I think you get the idea. I contributed a few. I think my best was The Sunspot Cycle Also Rises. My second favorite is Willy Wonka and the Elecraft Factory.