ARISS to go quiet this winter

From Weaver’s Words, the e-mail newsletter of Jim Weaver, K8JE, Great Lakes Division Director.

Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, of the ARISS program reports there will be no amateur radio operations from the International Space Station beginning 10 November through 7 December this year. The reason for the quiet hours is there will not be a radio amateur on board. Amateur operations continue until 10 November and will resume after 7 December when a new crew comes on board the station.

From my Twitter feed: Save the Easter bunny, loop antenna, your own satellite

 

o0ToTOm0o's avatarE22ICQ @o0ToTOm0o
Rescue the Easter Bunny – Ham Radio Fox Hunting for Beginners. youtu.be/tQ8gNHAFXXY fb.me/20HNd9HQh

 

kritikal's avatarAndrew Herron, W8FI@kritikal
Frank’s N4SPP Ham Radio home-built SM0VPO 80 40 20 meters compact spiral loop antenna nonstopsystems.com/radio/frank_ra… via @Delicious

 

UlisK3LU's avatarUlis K3LU @UlisK3LU
Send your own satellite into space for $1000 – smh.com.au/world/science/… via @smh

From my Twitter feed: Edinburgh Morse, hams hear old spacecraft,

G7AGI's avatarDavid De Silva @G7AGI
I’ve just discovered @edinburghmorse. Looking forward to seeing the new web site go live.

exploreplanets's avatarPlanetary Society @exploreplanets
Amateur radio enthusiasts were able to detect the carrier signal of a decades-old NASA spacecraft: planetary.org/blogs/emily-la…

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9vObject of Interest: Aereo’s Tiny Antennas newyorker.com/online/blogs/e… via @NewYorker

M0PZT's avatarCharlie – M0PZT @M0PZT
Blog updated: What Makes A Real Ham? m0pzt.com/?blog #hamradio

2014 Tech study guide: satellite operation

In this section, one question was dropped and another about Keplerian elements was added…Dan

As a Technician Class licensee, you can make contacts via amateur radio satellites. Any amateur whose license privileges allow them to transmit on the satellite uplink frequency may be the control operator of a station communicating through an amateur satellite or space station. (T8B01)

Amateur satellites are basically repeaters in space. As such they have an uplink frequency, which is the frequency on which you transmit and the satellite receives, and a downlink frequency, on which the satellite transmits and you receive. As with other transmissions, the minimum amount of power needed to complete the contact should be used on the uplink frequency of an amateur satellite or space station. (T8B02)

Often, the uplink frequency and downlink frequency are in different amateur bands. For example, when a satellite is operating in “mode U/V,” the satellite uplink is in the 70 cm band and the downlink is in the 2 meter band. (T8B08)

The International Space Station often has amateur radio operators on board. Any amateur holding a Technician or higher class license may make contact with an amateur station on the International Space Station using 2 meter and 70 cm band amateur radio frequencies. (T8B04) Like most amateur satellites, the Space Station is in low earth orbit. When used to describe an amateur satellite, the initials LEO means that the satellite is in a Low Earth Orbit. (T8B10)

Amateur satellites are often equipped with beacons. A satellite beacon is a transmission from a space station that contains information about a satellite. (T8B05) FM Packet is a commonly used method of sending signals to and from a digital satellite. (T8B11)

How do you know when you are able to communicate via an amateur satellite? A satellite tracking program can be used to determine the time period during which an amateur satellite or space station can be accessed. (T8B03) The Keplerian elements are inputs to a satellite tracking program. (T8B06)

Two problems that you must deal with when communicating via satellite is Doppler shift and spin fading. Doppler shift is an observed change in signal frequency caused by relative motion between the satellite and the earth station. (T8B07) Rotation of the satellite and its antennas causes “spin fading” of satellite signals. (T8B09)

From my Twitter feed: deep-space signals, making PCBs, SWL skeds

VoiceOfHamRadio's avatarVoice of Ham Radio @VoiceOfHamRadio
Radio Amateurs Receive Rosetta Spacecraft Signals from Deep Space zite.to/1nxMq2L via @Zite

 

hackaday's avatar

hackaday @hackaday
New post: [CNLohr] Demos His Photoetch PCB Process bit.ly/1a8TQpm

 

QSLRptMT's avatarGayle Van Horn @QSLRptMT
Still looking for winter shortwave schedules to compliment your listening ? Details at: mt-shortwave.blogspot.com

Say “HI” to Juno recap

On October 9, thousands of amateurs said “HI to Juno. Now, there are stories about the event on websites all over. I think the best is this video produced by NASA:

AMSAT-UK also ran a story about Say HI to Juno. I like this story because it includes a waterfall display of the 10m band showing all the signals.

Physics.Org ran the story, “Juno spacecraft hears amateur radio operators say ‘Hi.’”  This story features a photo of a smiling Tony Rogers, the president of the University of Iowa ham radio club, as he mans the equipment used to send the message to the Juno spacecraft.

 

Amateur radio in the news: Ft. Wayne (IN) hamfest, CA ISS contact, Roger on the Radio

Another selection of news items about amateur radio from around the country.

Hamfest brings on-air friends together (Journal-Gazette of Ft. Wayne, IN). Amy Kritzman and her husband, Ron, occupied some prime real estate as the 41st annual Fort Wayne Hamfest and Computer Expo opened Saturday. Facing the entrance, the Kritzmans don’t carry the adapters, cords and tools that thousands of ham radio operators forage through every year. What the couple have in stock is personality. One look around Memorial Coliseum Exposition Center’s floor and it’s obvious the Kritzmans are known for their custom-embroidered hats, featuring the names and call signs of radio operators in different thread colors.

Teen takes lead on call to International Space Station.(Contra Costa Times, CA). More than 100 students sat on the playground of Rancho Romero Elementary School on Wednesday morning staring into the clear, blue sky, waiting for their 10-minute date with an astronaut. Many watched in rapt anticipation for one of the two 14-foot antenna towers perched atop one of the school’s buildings to tilt into motion. That, they were told, would be the first sign they had made direct contact with the International Space Station.

Roger, N4ZC, has hosted a radio show on WSGE in Charlotte, NC, playing big band music for the past 33 years.

‘Roger on Your Radio’ signs off at WSGE. For 33 years, Roger Burt – aka “Roger on Your Radio” – stood inside radio station WSGE’s studio at Gaston College in Dallas and broadcast his four-hour radio program called “The Good Stuff,” which featured music from the big band eras.

From my Twitter Feed: Antarctica, tech writing, FUNcube, end-fed half-wave

 There’s so much good stuff on my Twitter feed this afternoon, I couldn’t limit myself to just three Tweets…Dan

DX_World's avatarDX World @DX_World
VK0GB – Casey Base, Antarctica: Gerry, VK0GB (G3WIP) is located at Casey Base, Antarctica until February 2014…. bit.ly/1beTklH

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9v
Tech paper writing tips: A dark and stormy night | EDN edn.com/electronics-bl… via @EDNcom

 

FakeScience's avatarFake Science @FakeScience
Someone forgot to put “Saltine” on this copy of the Periodic Table.

 

2e0sql's avatarPeter Goodhall @2e0sql
Amsat-UK have released a handbook for the FUNcube-1 satellite, the launch date is rapidly approaching 13 days to go! wp.me/p3TuHs-kE

MW0IAN's avatarIan @MW0IAN
The versatile end-fed wire VK3YE home.alphalink.com.au/~parkerp/gatew… #hamr

Say “HI” to Juno

On October 9, 2013, the spacecraft Juno will fly by Earth to get a gravity assist and put it on a course for Jupiter. To celebrate this event, NASA is inviting amateur radio operators around the world to say “HI” to Juno in a coordinated Morse Code message. Juno’s radio and plasma wave experiment, called Waves, should be able to detect the message if enough people participate.

Say HI to Juno

NASA is asking us to send the letters “HI” in verrrrry slow Morse Code on 26 different frequencies in the 10m band. I say verrrrry slow because each dit is 30 seconds long.

The event is to start at 1800 UTC on October 9 and last until 2040 UTC. The “HI” message is to be repeated every 10 minutes, beginning at 18:00, 18:10, 18:20, etc. as shown in the figure below.

Say HI to Juno

The Say HI to Juno Web page has much more information on this event. The page include a table of frequencies on which to transmit and information on how to get a QSL card. There is also a Facebook page.

I think that this is a very cool event, and I hope that if you have the capability of transmitting on 10m that you’ll participate. Let’s all say HI to Juno!

From the trade magazines: satellite tracking, online circuit design, open-source test board

More cool stuff from the electronics engineering trade magazines….Dan

LEO satellite tracking in your backyard. Learn how one guy built his own satellite tracking system in his backyard.

The rise of the online circuit-design collective. Though still in the infancy stage, design and simulation tools that run entirely in the browser are pushing their way onto the EDA landscape. The ultimate goal is that they become essential players within the realm of professional design.

Test and measurement  turns to open source, Kickstarter. The field of test and measurement is set to benefit from open-source software applications if a Kickstarter fundraising project is successful. The Red Pitaya is a credit card-sized, reconfigurable measurement board with 60MHz of input bandwidth and an onboard Xilinx Zinq FPGA to perform signal processing.