Hams that write books

www.amazon.comwww.amazon.comLots of amateur radio operators have written books. Gordon West, WB6NOA, has his line of license study guides, Ward Silver, N0AX, has written a number of different books, most notably Ham Radio for Dummies, and Dave Ingram, K4TWJ, wrote many books.

There are some hams who have written about topics other than amateur radio, though. Recently, I worked Jack Sanders, K1IFJ. During the course of our QSO, I discovered that he had been the editor of the Ridgefield Press, a newspaper in Connecticut and the author of The Secrets of Wildflowers. I enjoy wildflowers, so I purchased Jack’s book, and am enjoying it a lot.

Another ham who has written a book unrelated to amateur radio is Jim McCulloch, WD7H. His book, Fracture Gradient, is about the technology of “fracking.” The cover describes it as “a heroic tale of discovery and greed that fractures a critical economic paradigm, threatens the international balance of power and challenges the concept of rugged individualism.”

Of course, there is also Art Bell, W6OBB. He’s penned a number of titles on paranormal phenomena. The latest appears to be The Coming Global Superstorm, which was published in 2001. I haven’t actually read any of his books, but I would imagine that they are as entertaining as his radio show.

Now, I’m curious about other hams who have written books. If you know of any please let me know by commenting below or by e-mailing me. Thanks!

Amateur radio in the news: emergency communications in FL, Museum Ships Weekend

This TV report highlights the emergency preparedness of hams in Tampa Bay, FL.

This TV report highlights the emergency preparedness of hams in Tampa Bay, FL.

Amateur radio operators ‘vital’ to emergency response. They’re some of the most critical people for a hurricane response, but you may be surprised, even concerned, when you first hear who they are: amateurs. 10 News looked at the people our rescuers rely on when the power goes out and the phones go silent.

Master of the airwaves. John Sluymer has been social networking since 1972. There was no Twitter or Facebook when the Grassie resident first picked up a radio unit a little more than four decades ago. Instead of hashtags and status updates, Sluymer would either talk into his mic or tap out his message in Morse code. Just like today’s social networks offer users a chance to interact with people on all sides of the world, Sluymer’s hobby has allowed him to reach — both physically and through radio waves — even the most remote areas of the planet.

Museum Ships Radio Weekend USS Lexington (video). They say its like finding a needle in a hay stack. All weekend long volunteers on board the USS Lexington are reaching out and talking to other museum ships around the world.  Its part of the annual Museum Ships Weekend. It’s a competition where the point is to make contact with at least fifteen other Museum ships by using a ham radio.  Those museum ships who are actually able to contact at least 15 other ships by using a Ham radio receive a certificate.

Jim, K8ELR, redux

I got an e-mail today from a guy who was looking for my good friend Jim, K8ELR (SK). Jim was my sidekick down at WA2HOM and one of the nicest guys that you’d ever meet.

The guy wrote, “I am currently listening to what sounds like a radio broadcast on AM 5.090 MHz. I am hearing K8ELR in a discussion and was wondering what frequency they are actually transmitting on. I tried to contact  James Eller directly but his email address listed on QRZ.com bounced.”

I informed him that Jim has been an SK for several years now and asked if he recalled what radio show he had been listening to.

As it turns out, this was a re-broadcast of a QSO Radio Show. I find it a little amusing that Randall, the show’s MC and producer would re-run this show a couple years later. If you’d like to hear the show, go to http://www.tedrandall.com/media/podcat/qso-03-17-09.mp3.

Randall actually interviewed me for a show, but for whatever reason, it never got on the air. I inquired about it one time, but he never returned my e-mail.  He talked to me for over an hour. Maybe he accidentally deleted the recording or just didn’t find me that interesting. :)

Operating Notes: traffic, bees, Ernst Krenkel

One of the students in my last Tech class, has taken up traffic handling. This evening, he forwarded a piece of traffic to me:

Message Number 1058
Routine
HXG
Station or Origin: KD8RCR
Check 25
Place of Origin: Midland Mi
Date: Nov 26th

IF HF CAPABLE PLEASE JOIN
US ON MACS NET 10AM
AND MITN NET 7PM BOTH
ON 3952 KHZ X WE
NEED YOUR PARTICIPATION X
73
Ryan KB8RCR

Somewhere along the way, “KB” got changed to “KD” or vice versa, but it was cool to get it.

The bee’s knees
Last night, I worked Curt, N5CW, on 40m CW. This wasn’t the first time that I’d contacted Curt, but it was the first time that he mentioned that he kept bees. He isn’t the first ham radio operator/beekeeper that I’ve worked. A couple of weeks ago, I worked KC4URI, who also keeps bees, and a while back, W3BEE. I’ve now worked more beekeepers (3) than I have barbers (2).

Ernst Krenkel
RAEMThis evening, I worked RD110RAEM, a special event station commemorating the 110th anniversary of the Arctic explorer and amateur radio operator, Ernst Krenkel, RAEM (1903-1971). He was a famous polar explorer, Hero of the Soviet Union, chairman of the USSR Radiosport Federation (1959-1971), and the first chairman of Central Radio Club of the USSR. There’s even an Ernst Krenkel Museum of Radio and Radio Amateurs in Moscow.

According to Southgate Amateur Radio News, there will be 23 special event stations operating throughout the month of December commemorating Krenkel, including 20 in Russia and three in the Ukraine. On Sunday, December 29, the 42nd RAEM International CW HF Contest will take place.

Operating Notes: triple play, 2m loop, W5LJT (SK)

Here are some random recollections of recent QSOs:

Triple play!
At WA2HOM Saturday, I decided to forego the CQWW CW contest and make some phone contacts. After listening to some guys on 20m, I switched to 15m and found that it was open. Tuning around, I heard Alvaro, EA2BY working some guy on the East Coast. Now, I don’t have “BY” in my collection of QSL cards from stations whose callsigns spell words, so I hung around until he was finished with the East Cost QSO and got him in the log on the first call. He was running only 20 W, but had a four-element, 15m quad, so he had a pretty good signal.

After that QSO, I tuned around a bit more, then decided to call CQ. I called CQ three or four times before IW1ARK came back to me. That made two!

Just before I left the museum, I decided to tune around on 20m phone. That’s where I worked Bob, W0ROB, to complete the triple play. Bob and I had a great conversation about amateur radio stations in museums. He used to go to Arizona for the winter and has operated W7ASC, the station at the Arizona Science Center.

2m loop
About a week ago, I was blabbing with a couple of guys from one of my Tech classes on the W8UM repeater (145.23-, 100 Hz tone, W8UM-R on EchoLink) when Ron, NB8Q, broke in. Ron was using a 2m loop antenna that he just built. What made the remarkable is that it was inside his mobile home!  I told him that he should make a reflector, but he said that he didn’t have enough space for it in his mobile home.

W5LJT (SK)
This evening, I got some bad news. Bill, W5LJT, is now an SK.

i always enjoyed talking to Bill. He liked to talk about the Detroit Red Wings. Despite living in the Houston area, he was a long-time hockey fan, going back to his days as a student at Notre Dame in South Bend, IN. He told me that sometimes he would take a train from South Bend to Detroit to catch a Red Wings game at the Olympia Stadium.

My log says that I had 27 QSOs with Bill over the past ten years. I’m sorry that I won’t be having another one.

Amateur radio in the news: Ft. Wayne (IN) hamfest, CA ISS contact, Roger on the Radio

Another selection of news items about amateur radio from around the country.

Hamfest brings on-air friends together (Journal-Gazette of Ft. Wayne, IN). Amy Kritzman and her husband, Ron, occupied some prime real estate as the 41st annual Fort Wayne Hamfest and Computer Expo opened Saturday. Facing the entrance, the Kritzmans don’t carry the adapters, cords and tools that thousands of ham radio operators forage through every year. What the couple have in stock is personality. One look around Memorial Coliseum Exposition Center’s floor and it’s obvious the Kritzmans are known for their custom-embroidered hats, featuring the names and call signs of radio operators in different thread colors.

Teen takes lead on call to International Space Station.(Contra Costa Times, CA). More than 100 students sat on the playground of Rancho Romero Elementary School on Wednesday morning staring into the clear, blue sky, waiting for their 10-minute date with an astronaut. Many watched in rapt anticipation for one of the two 14-foot antenna towers perched atop one of the school’s buildings to tilt into motion. That, they were told, would be the first sign they had made direct contact with the International Space Station.

Roger, N4ZC, has hosted a radio show on WSGE in Charlotte, NC, playing big band music for the past 33 years.

‘Roger on Your Radio’ signs off at WSGE. For 33 years, Roger Burt – aka “Roger on Your Radio” – stood inside radio station WSGE’s studio at Gaston College in Dallas and broadcast his four-hour radio program called “The Good Stuff,” which featured music from the big band eras.

Ham radio in the news: Nobel prize winner, social media (old school), JOTA

Laid groundwork for cholesterol drugs – From ham radios to Nobel Prize for local scientist. A Nobel Laureate recently spoke about “How to win a Nobel Prize” on Sept. 11 at Chestnut Hill College’s 20th anniversary of its Biomedical Lecture Series. Dr. Michael S. Brown, 72, who grew up in Elkins Park, said an amateur radio operating license obtained at the age of 13, while a student at Thomas Williams Junior High School in Wyncote, sparked his passion for science.

Ham radio: it’s social media old school style. Long ago, before Facebook, Twitter and email, ham radio operators were the original social media geeks. And they’re still out there, in greater numbers than ever, chatting and messaging each other all over the world without an Internet connection or even a telephone line.

Scouts learn technology through radio. Local boy and girl scouts came from all over the Southern Tier and beyond to learn about technology at the Kopernik Observatory. Jamboree on the Air taught scouts how to communicate with each other using amateur radios on Saturday. Scouts learned how to send and receive digital pictures and even spoke with other scouts as far away as Florida.

Wayne Green, W2NSD, SK

w2nsd

Wayne Green, W2NSD, one of the real characters of amateur radio passed away Friday.  This from the Wayne’s World website:

Wayne Green passed away this morning in a peaceful, painless transition from this life on Earth. An eternal optimist, and one who loved to share his never-ending zest for life, he was a friend to many and will be missed greatly. Wayne was not afraid of dying and was very much ready to embark on his next great adventure to the afterlife.

If you would like to write a note to him or about him, please email it to dhlc@comcast.net and I will share it here on Wayne’s blog.

There are already many tributes there. Even if you didn’t know him like many hams of my generation did, it would be worthwhile to read some of them. More information about W2NSD, can be found on his Wikipedia page. TheARRL website also has a story on Wayne Green.

Amateur radio in the news: GA ISS contact (video), ABQ hams reach out

Students at a school in Alpharetta, GA got to talk with a U.S. astronaut in real time via ham radio as he passed over Mill Springs Academy onboard the International Space Station on Wednesday.

Local hams ‘reach out and touch someone’ around the globe. When Larry Elkin of Rio Rancho was going to college in New York, he picked up a radio transmission astronaut John Glenn sent from orbit around Earth. Now, Elkin is president of the High Desert Amateur Radio Club of New Mexico Inc., a local group that aims to educate people about amateur radio operation and is available to help with emergency communication.

101-year-old Bill Finch (W4EHF, SK) was Senior Games competitor, amateur radio enthusiast. Bill Finch was as charmingly timeless as the hobbies he pursued. He was an amateur radio aficionado well into his 90s and an athlete whose prowess in the Senior Games may well stand the test of time.

Bill seems like someone I’d want to know….Dan

Amateur radio in the news: students earn licenses, tower exemptions, making friends

Petal teacher helps students earn amateur radio licenses. Petal High School Information Technology teacher Brad Amacker helped his students earn amateur radio licenses thanks to a grant he received during the 2012-13 school year. Amacker received the Mississippi Professional Educators Classroom Grant Award. He was recognized for this award at the August 13th school board meeting.

City supports exemptions for towers used by amateur radio operators. Garry Schwartz says his 19-metre amateur radio tower has been up for so long, most people don’t notice it unless he decorates it for Christmas. Schwartz, president of the Saskatoon Amateur Radio Club, is happy that the city seems prepared to relax restrictions for amateur radio towers despite more restrictive rules pending for new commercial antenna towers. “I’m pleased with the results,” Schwartz said Tuesday after a meeting of the city’s planning and operations committee. Schwartz said his antenna has been in place for 40 years.

Making friends a world away. Marilynn Jordan was the guest speaker at the Crestline-Lake Gregory Rotary Club’s morning program on July 25, and she spoke to members about how easy it is today to enjoy the amateur radio hobby. “It’s really a lot of fun,” she said. “I’ve spoken to radio operators in Greenland, Finland and all over South America. Everyone speaks English, so it’s very easy for us to talk with other ham radio operators.”