From my inbox: Morse Code, WWV, Raspberry Pi

Here are three interesting items that I found out about by reading my e-mail:

  • Original Morse Code with Phillips PunctuationMorse Code Chart, including Phillips Punctuation. At right is a chart, showing the American Morse Code with Phillips punctuation. According to the book, A treatise on telegraphy, published in 1901, “The Phillips punctuation has superseded the Morse for punctuations, and and is much more complete and systematic. Except for submarine telegraphy, the Morse code for letters and numerals and the Phillips code for punctuation are used throughout the United States and Canada.” Click on the image for a larger, more readable chart.
  • At The Tone is the first comprehensive audio survey of NIST Radio Stations WWV and WWVH: two legendary shortwave radio broadcasters whose primary purpose is the dissemination of scientifically precise time and frequency. Offered here publicly for the first time, the set represents a huge cross-section of the stations’ “life and times,” including recordings of obsolete formats, original voices and identifications, special announcements, format changes, “leap seconds,” and other aural oddities from 1955 to 2005. Produced, compiled, and edited by Myke over a 20-year period (1992-2012), At The Tone is alternately strange and mundane, monotonous and compelling, erudite and obscure. Recommended for fans of The Conet Project, The Ghost Orchid, and other radio-related ephemera.
  • Raspberry Pi 4 Ham Radio.  This mailing is for amateur radio operators using the Raspberry Pi in ham radio applications. Looks interesting, but am not sure I want to subscribe to yet another ham radio mailing list.

Comments

  1. Elwood Downey, WB0OEW says:

    Thanks for the tips. “At the Tone” was fascinating, I remember many of those announcements (ok, tell me to get a life if I spend time actually listening to WWV!) As for the Pi list, I agree it’s yet another list but went ahead and signed up. I got a Pi a few weeks ago. So far I have it serving up plots of real-time solar 10 cm and x-ray flux values it aggregates from various sources found around the web, you can see them on my little web page at http://www.clearskyinstitute.com/ham.

  2. Nice page. Is the Pi actually serving the Web page or collecting and providing the data, or what?

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