Some Recent, Remarkable QSOs

Time to tell you about a few recent QSOs that I found remarkable:

  • AH6V. I just worked Jerry, AH6V, not more than 15 minutes ago. At first, I almost didn’t believe him when he gave his QTH as Hawaii. Then, I looked him up on QRZ.Com. Not only is he in HI, but he’s in a fairly remote part of the big island of Hawaii. He’s got quite a shack, too (see below).

    According to his QRZ.Com page, he’s 100% solar powered.
  • PU2AIL. Lia, PU2AIL is a 16-year-old YL from Brasil. Who says ham radio isn’t for girls and young people. She had a very nice fist, too. Also, her QSL card will look great in my collection of QSLs from stations whose callsigns spell words.
  • W5CUB. My QSO with Paul, W5CUB, wasn’t so remarkable, as it was just a quick contest QSO. But, not only does his callsign spell a word, but there’s a great story behind it. According to his QRZ.Com page, he was first licensed in 1978 while still in high school in Chicago. His first callsign was KA9CUB, which was perfect for a Chicago Cubs fan! Although he now lives in TX, he’s still not only a Cubs fan, but flies a Piper Cub airplane. What a perfect callsign, no?
  • HG2010P. This is a special event station celebrating Pecs, Hungary as one of the European Capitals of Culture for 2010. If you work this station and other Hungarian special event stations several times, you can qualify for a certificate.

Comments

  1. Hi Dan, nice QSOs. If you need a sked? My callsign spells my name. 73, Bas PE4BAS

    • Thanks for the offer, Bas, but I don’t include names or any proper nouns in my collection. I know that’s kind of silly, but the whole thing is kind of silly. :)

  2. Good morning, Dan. Regarding your photo of the shack of AH6V, I can’t be sure but I think the basic structure is pre made and that the were originally made for radio station remote vans. One of the FM stations here in Spokane has had one for years. Course AH6V might have seen one of the vans and that was what inspired his van.

    Mike WN5PMR

  3. AH6V sure does have a unique shack a one of a kind!

  4. Hello Dan,

    I love posts like this. Thanks for sharing this unusual station with us. This gives ham radio a “personal touch” when you work this kind of a contact. I once stayed in a similar place in Hawaii. It was literally a “cabin” in the jungle, complete with a “crowing rooster” for the morning alarm clock. The roof leaked, heated with a small wood burning stove, just the essentials. Not your typical “tourist” dwelling but for $45 a night, it allowed us to hear the jungle sounds and watch a spectacular sunrise. It was alive, if you know what I mean.

    If we ever return, I think I’ll just pitch a tent….

    Thanks again for the post.

    • I know exactly what you mean, John. My wife and I stayed in a similar place on one of our trips to Hawaii. Hawaiii is such a wonderful place. I’d love to be able to retire there.

  5. Me too…but not on the coast. Tsunami country…. , and you’d need a whole truck full of money. It’s incredibly expensive. The last time I was there, we walked on top of an old town. It was 75 feet below us covered under magma. Hot time in the ‘ol town that night. Living up in the hill country is a really good idea. I wonder how much he wants for that property? Maybe we will win the lottery….

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