More Stuff I Gleaned from Twitter

Here are thee more items I discovered via Twitter:

  • Ham Mag #6. The June 2009 issue of this free electronic magazine is now available for download (it’s a PDF file). This issue includes articles on a QRP transceiver for 20m, a 10m rubber duck antenna for the FT-817, and Chuck Blaney, a WWII radio operator.
  • Why Join a Ham Club? This article from the ARRL website makes the case for joining a ham club. It could be a little more detailed, but hopefully it will get more newcomers to join clubs.
  • Tesla Coil @NLL 3/3. This video shows Greg Leyh’s 40kW 11-foot secondary Tesla Coil operating at NLL in San Francisco for DorkbotSF Jun 4 2009. Very impressive.

My Twitter id is kb6nu. If you follow me, you’ll get tweets notifying you of new blog posts, plus various musings on band conditions and the contacts I make.

Operating Notes

Here are some miscellaneous observations from my operations over the past week or so:

  • W1MX Turns 100. The MIT Radio Society, whose callsign is W1MX turned 100 on April 30, 2009. There was a great article on the history of the club in the April 2009 issue of QST. I had just read that article last Sunday, when I got an e-mail from KA8WFC, saying that he was going to be operating W1MX that evening. I got him on his cellphone around 8:30, and we made contact a short time later.

    It was a great thrill to work a station with such a cool history. And to think that I used to live in Somerville, MA, probably only five miles from W1MX, and never thought to visit the station.

  • Short Skip. I’ve noticed lately that the skip on 40m can be very short right around sundown. A week ago, I worked WA8JNM, near Cleveland, less than 150 miles away from me at 8:30pm (0030Z). Tonight, I worked KZ9H, near Indianapolis, not more than 230 miles away, at 9:00pm (0100Z). Both stations were 599 here. Can any of you propagation experts explain this to me?
  • Long Skip. I’m also working DX on 40m. Last night, I got on just after 10pm (0200Z). The band was kind of quiet, so I started calling CQ on 7033 kHz. After a couple of CQs, Alex, SP8ERY called. I quickly looked him up on QRZ.Com, and found a very interesting Web page that included a picture of his grandfather (right). Alex writes, “He was a radio operator during I World War. He worked on simple crystal RX and spark TX and in 1960’s when I was a young boy, he taught me first few letters of Morse code.” Since it was apparent that he knew quite a bit of English, we had a nice chat, not the usual 599/599 TU kind of DX contact.
    After working Alex, I heard IY8GM booming at 10 dB over S9. He was an easy catch. I then tuned upband again and called CQ around 7027. There, I got a call from another SP station. When we finished our short QSO, I got a call from OM3CDR. Juraj, as it turned out, also knew some English, so I was able to tell him that I am Slovak-American and had visited his home town, Bratislava.
    All in all, it was quite a good night for DX