Wanna review my new study guide?

techclasscov_2014I have completed the PDF, Kindle (.mobi), and Nook (ePub) versions of the new edition of the Tech study guide. If you’d be interested in having an advance look at it, e-mail me, and I’ll send you a copy.

I have an ulterior motive, of course. I’d like to get your comments and see if you can find any typos before I release it to the general public. I’m only going to send it to about a dozen people, so that I can keep track of the copies that I do send out.

Coiling Cables

A couple of years ago at Field Day, Bruce, KT8TD, tried to show me how to coil cables properly. using the “over-under” technique. Using this technique helps prevent cables from getting all tangled when you uncoil them. I really was too tired at the time to pay much attention, and I never really learned the trick.

Yesterday, though, someone on Twitter posted a link to a Boing Boing post that describes the technique and links to a YouTube video (below) that shows you how to do it. I practiced with some tangled cables I had laying around the shack, and now think that I can coil with the best of them. Try it. It really works.

Next one-day Tech class, Saturday, May 3, 2014

My next One-Day Tech Class will be held on Saturday, May 3, 2014 from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm at the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, 221 E. Ann St., Ann Arbor, MI. Immediately after the class, the Technician Class license exam will be administered.

Pre-registration is required, and there is a $10 fee to take the class, but the fee will be waived for anyone under the age of 18. We often fill the class and have to put people on the waiting list. So, if you would like to take this class, send a check or money order to reserve your spot to:

Dan Romanchik, KB6NU
1325 Orkney Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48103.

You can also pay by sending money via PayPal to cwgeek@kb6nu.com.

Prospective students should download the study guide IMMEDIATELY. Read through it a couple of times and take some online practice tests (URLs for practice test websites can be found in the study guide) before coming to class. Studying beforehand greatly increase the chances that you’ll pass the test.

If you have any questions, please e-mail me or phone 734-930-6564.

From my Twitter feed: digital TV, vintage computers, 10 GHz

ke9v's avatarJeff Davis @ke9v
DATV-Express digital-ATV project flip.it/GUG5j #hamradio

 

Apple1computer's avatarDavid Larsen KK4WW @Apple1computer
RT @computerhobby: #Vintage #Computers Peek inside the Bugbook Historical Microcomputer Museum warehouse ow.ly/vAczx #Floyd_VA

I used to work for Jon Titus, one of the founders and owners of the company that published the Bugbooks. Jon’s a ham, too. His call is KZ1G.

 

arrl's avatar

ARRL @arrl
ARRL Asks FCC to Dismiss “Fatally Flawed” Petition for Rule Making Affecting 10 GHz: The ARRL has told the FCC… tinyurl.com/n3948yc

Who else is on Twitter?

Follow Me on TwitterFor the past year or so, I’ve been fairly active on Twitter. My id there is @kb6nu.

I’ve found it to be a great adjunct to my ham radio operations. Whenever I turn on the rig, I also open a window on the computer and log into Twitter (via TweetDeck). Twitter brings me ham radio news, information about current band conditions, and links to items of interest to electronics experimenters. I “follow” nearly 900 other hams and electronics experimenters, and I now have a following of almost 2,000.

Just as important, it’s helped me make contact, both virtually and literally, with other, like-minded hams. For example, several times I’ve Tweeted that I’m calling CQ on such and such a band or frequency and have had guys see that Tweet and answer my CQ on the air. At other times, a small group of have formed a “team” for some major contest.

If you’re not yet a Twitter user, give it a try. You can start out by following me and searching for the hashtags #hamr and #hamradio. If you’re already a user, follow me, and I’ll follow you back.

Kindess of Strangers

In the closing moments of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Name Desire, Blanche DuBois utters her most memorable line, “Whoever you are, I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.” Amateur radio operators are sometimes like that.

hk-5aI recently came into possession of a HamKey HK-5A keyer (see right). HamKey has been out of business for many years, so I had to depend on the kindness of strangers to find any kind of documentation for the unit.

Fortunately, Google and the hams out there came through. I Googled “HamKey HK-5A” and found a thread on an eHam forum. In the thread, N5RDN offered to make a copy of his manual for KW4MM. I emailed Rob, N5RDN, and a PDF of the manual appeared in my inbox this morning.

Thanks, Rob!  I now offer the HK-5A-manual here for anyone who needs it.

From my Twitter feed: Save the Easter bunny, loop antenna, your own satellite

 

o0ToTOm0o's avatarE22ICQ @o0ToTOm0o
Rescue the Easter Bunny – Ham Radio Fox Hunting for Beginners. youtu.be/tQ8gNHAFXXY fb.me/20HNd9HQh

 

kritikal's avatarAndrew Herron, W8FI@kritikal
Frank’s N4SPP Ham Radio home-built SM0VPO 80 40 20 meters compact spiral loop antenna nonstopsystems.com/radio/frank_ra… via @Delicious

 

UlisK3LU's avatarUlis K3LU @UlisK3LU
Send your own satellite into space for $1000 – smh.com.au/world/science/… via @smh

A photo from Field Day 1948

I love this photo of Field Day 1948. It’s a reminder that it’s time to start thinking about this year’s Field Day…Dan

A.Radio News Sept 1948

Here’s the accompanying article.

New clock accurate to within 1s every 300 million years

14PML013_f2_jefferts_heavner_LR

NIST physicists Steve Jefferts (foreground) and Tom Heavner with the NIST-F2 “cesium fountain” atomic clock, a new civilian time standard for the United States. Credit: NIST

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has officially launched a new atomic clock, called NIST-F2, to serve as a new U.S. civilian time and frequency standard, along with the current NIST-F1 standard.

NIST-F2 would neither gain nor lose one second in about 300 million years, making it about three times as accurate as NIST-F1, which has served as the standard since 1999. Both clocks use a “fountain” of cesium atoms to determine the exact length of a second.

NIST scientists recently reported the first official performance data for NIST-F2,* which has been under development for a decade, to the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), located near Paris, France. That agency collates data from atomic clocks around the world to produce Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the international standard of time. According to BIPM data, NIST-F2 is now the world’s most accurate time standard.**

NIST-F2 is the latest in a series of cesium-based atomic clocks developed by NIST since the 1950s. In its role as the U.S. measurement authority, NIST strives to advance atomic timekeeping, which is part of the basic infrastructure of modern society. Many everyday technologies, such as cellular telephones, Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite receivers, and the electric power grid, rely on the high accuracy of atomic clocks. Historically, improved timekeeping has consistently led to technology improvements and innovation.

Read more and watch video …

Read background information about how NIST F-2 Works and watch animation …

From my Twitter feed: amateur radio course, SwiftKey, BeagleBone

Radio_2_Radio's avatarRadio Guy @Radio_2_Radio
Amateur Radio: Ken Green's Amateur Radio Course – Clovelly Donkeys ow.ly/2FczP1

f6fvy's avatarLaurent Haas – F6FVY @f6fvy
Typing revolution : SwiftKey for physical keyboards bit.ly/1fkNPq6 #contesting #ohWait

DIYEngineering's avatarDIY Engineering @DIYEngineering
Boost Your BeagleBone Black with Breakout Board – Making a PCB is easier than you might expect. Read more on MAKE ow.ly/2FireZ